Thank You For Taking the Time to Enroll!

Sealaska recently announced a new online process for enrolling as a descendant or leftout. In an effort to bring awareness to the new process, Sealaska held a small contest. The contest was for anyone who enrolled online and submitted a complete application by December 16, 2018.

And the winners are.....

  1. Kayla Marie Joplin (Sedro Wooley, WA)
  2.  Jason Andrew Ford (Douglas, AK)

Enroll Today - Who Is Eligible
Sealaska has a perpetual enrollment for life estate stock (class "D", "L" and "E") with no closing date

When Sealaska was established under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA), 15,782 people enrolled with Sealaska and are often called “original” shareholders. Each original shareholder received 100 shares of class "A", "B" or "C" stock (read more about all classes of Sealaska stock at this link).

In 2007, Sealaska shareholders voted and approved to issue “life estate” shares to eligible descendants and leftouts. Life estate stock cease to exist upon the shareholders death. Eligibility for class "D" or "L" stock includes:

  1. ¼ blood quantum.
  2. A lineal descendant of a Sealaska shareholder or eligible to enroll in 1971.
  3. Not enrolled with another ANSCA corporation (if you were gifted or inherited shares this does not hinder you from applying for class "D" or" "L" stock).

Click here to read more about eligibility requirements.

Enroll Now for Class "D" or Class "L" Stock
Enrollment can occur anytime of the year

About Class "D" Stock
Also referred to as descendant stock - the new shares are issued to eligible shareholder descendants who apply and are approved.

    Class D stock is considered Life Estate stock and will cease to exist upon the death of the shareholder.
    Class D stock cannot be gifted or willed and has voting privileges.
    Class D stock receives dividend payments from the permanent fund and operations.

About Class "L" Stock
Also referred to as Leftout stock -- Leftout shareholders are those who were eligible to apply during the original ANSCA enrollment in 1971 but didn’t.

    Class “L” stock is considered life estate stock and will cease to exist upon the death of the shareholder.
    Class L stock cannot be gifted or willed and has voting privileges.
    Class L stock receives dividend payments from the permanent fund and operations.